Semester B Project


Archive for April, 2017

Autotune Vocal Effect

Posted in Uncategorized on April 11, 2017 by James Woodliffe

Something that is very contemporary is the autone vocal. Vocalists such as Kanye West use it effectively and can be used stylistically. This is something that I aim to put into a track on a chorus to attract the listeners attention.

Song 3 – Chainsmokers

Posted in Uncategorized on April 9, 2017 by James Woodliffe

This song inspired by Chainsmokers’ latest collaboration with Coldplay – “Something Just Like This”. Featuring keys, vocals and a drop – something that I haven’t incorporated before or ever written. The vocals are yet to go down, including the real instruments, which will be bass drum and claps etc. These will be used to thicken out the sound. The image shows the level of automation I have had to use on this track. I have had to microwork on this song due to my RAM not being able to cope and crashing every few seconds of playback – so it has been a struggle!


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Song Composition – Glen Ballard

Posted in Pop Music Analysis on April 9, 2017 by James Woodliffe

Glen Ballard, songwriter/producer that has sold over 150 million albums gave an interview in sound on sound about the most important assetsĀ of songwriter.producers and how to improve mixes of pop music. (LO3+LO4)

“When I collaborate with an artist, it is very important for me to understand what their goals are. It sounds like a question that doesn’t need to be asked, but it is a very important question. Some people want to be famous. If that is their number one goal, I am probably not the right person to be working with. I want them to be famous as a result of what we do. For me, the most important thing is the motivation of the artist and the commitment to making great music. So that is the first question. What do you want to do? When I get to the core of what somebody wants to accomplish, it makes it much easier to go out and do that.” – Albeit something that does not become relevant in my project, due to the nature of myself writing and producing for myself. It is difficult being both artist and producer, I am trying to produce pop music I enjoy and also want to produce.

“So don’t get obsessed with changing one thing. A special effect you’re looking for could take a day, and you waste a day chasing after something that isn’t going to make that much difference. I have learned over the years to try and keep focused on what really is important.” – Whilst mixing I have tried to limit changes and keep moving on within the mix instead of focusing on one aspect for too long. Otherwise I will spend a lot of time on one area which won’t improve much.

“I think a producer’s job involves many aspects. The most important thing that a producer can bring is judgment of material. A great song or a great piece of music is very hard to mess up. Your skills as a producer will only be elevated by the level of the material you are working with. If you are working with mediocre material, it takes a lot of work to make it palatable. Most of us have spent time on material that probably didn’t deserve that much time. “For me, it starts with that and knowing where to spend your time. It all goes back to developing a critical faculty in terms of understanding what really works. While it’s intangible, it’s something that you can develop an instinct about. I start with material. That is the first thing. If you are going to produce a record, what are the songs? If you don’t have any songs, that is your first order of business. If you don’t have anything that makes you excited, then you must find it.” – This is somethingĀ that I find the most relevant throughout this process. I have had many ideas floating about but whether they are good enough to work on or not is a different matter. When I haven’t fully invested in the material it has become a lot harder to write and produce which is time consuming work when I could be investing in other tracks.

http://www.soundonsound.com/people/glen-ballard-songwriterproducer

 

Technical Problems

Posted in Uncategorized on April 7, 2017 by James Woodliffe

 

 

 

 

 

Technical problems, whenever Logic Pro X stop I’ll have this message appear. I have followed the instructions and am still experiencing issues. I have researched online and this can be solved by increasing the RAM. I currently have 8Gb RAM, which I can not increase anymore – so it looks like I’m going to have to work in small sections at a time and bounce out to listen. Frustrating, but it has to be done.

 

 

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